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Freiburger Materialforschungszentrum
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You are here: Home Events Dr. Alexander Kühne "Conjugated Polymer Particles for Photonic and Biomedical Applications"

Dr. Alexander Kühne "Conjugated Polymer Particles for Photonic and Biomedical Applications"

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What
  • Seminar
When Jan 29, 2014
from 02:15 PM to 03:00 PM
Where Seminarraum A, FMF, Stefan-Meier-Str. 21, Freiburg
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Conjugated polymers constitute ideal materials for Organic Photonics due to their high gain and quantum yield characteristics. The synthesis of conjugated polymers is easy and the composition and functionalization of the desired polymer can be precisely tuned. However, problems arise after synthesis when the conjugated polymers need to be modified or structured in accordance with their prospective applications. The polymers lack suitable recognition sites for biomedical interactions and application in photonic devices requires complicated nanofabrication techniques to impose a periodic resonator structure and provide feedback.

I will discuss the potential of monodisperse conjugated polymer particles to overcome these limitations. The synthetic route towards conjugated polymer particles provides means for specific surface modification and creation of core-shell architectures, while maintaining accurate control over the monodispersity and the optical properties of the polymer. Surface bound biological motifs can be used to control the aggregation of the particles into defined clusters and they provide recognition sites to attach the particles to tumor cells and allow imaging. Moreover, the monodisperse particles can self-assemble into periodic structures without the requirement for time- and energy-consuming fabrication techniques. By incorporating photochromic moieties, these colloidal photonic crystals exhibit switchable fluorescence performance and shifting of the photonic bandgap.

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